Another Weekend Passed

It seems like the weekends go by in a blur. Between school work of my own, the kid’s school work, friends, activities with our church, and just trying to keep up with everyday life, Friday through Sunday all run together. Our lives are run by schedules, deadlines, and appointments that it feels like there is little to no time to stop and enjoy the life we have been blessed with.

I suppose being busy is better than being laden with boredom or solitude. Although, there are days when the idea of having nothing to do and nobody or obligations to attend to seems like a lofty dream, one I find myself wishing to come true. Don’t get me wrong, my life is full and good. I love my children, husband, and the family and friends that are a part of our lives. Lord knows where I’d be without any of them. However, I don’t feel it’s entirely selfish to want, and need, some personal time away from the hustle of everyday life. A day without kids complaining or fighting, a day without my phone ringing or an assignment being due, a day where my biggest concern is staying hydrated and enjoying my massage.

The blessings in my life are numerous, this I cannot deny. I’ve even learned to see blessings in things that would not be considered ‘good’ or even a blessing in disguise. It’s those moments, those encounters, and those situations that I see the opportunity for growth or to gain knowledge- both of which are blessings. Trials strengthen you. Hard times put your life into perspective. Worry, while I don’t see the feeling or manifestation of it as particularly beneficial, can bring you closer to sources of support and encouragement. I have learned to pursue God in these times of worry or uncertainty, to take difficult situations and use them as a guide for the future, and to take hard times on the chin because, if I can make it through (insert something less than enjoyable here) then I can make it through anything. It’s like strengthening an emotional and psychological muscle with God as my spotter.

But, muscles tire and hit a point of failure. You feel it a short time before it occurs but the signs are clear. Things you were doing with very little effort or thought start becoming harder to push through. There’s a little uncertainty in the choices and decisions you make, like wondering if you can really push through the next set. I get tired and weak, but at the same time I’m energized. My sleep pattern is all over the place because of this. My body and my emotions are spent but my mind doesn’t shut off.

Like regular exercise, it gets tiring after awhile; the routine, the monotony, and having to fight through everyday, sometimes by the hour, in order to provide a life to my children and to hopefully modeling to them how to live their own life. I’d be lying if I said there weren’t day where I wanted to quit; days when I would love nothing more than to not have to answer to “Mom” being called through the house, days when I didn’t end up in an argument over the words I say and how they were said, and days where I don’t have to hear the members of my family complaining or crying over the actions of another member in the family.

Peace. Calm. Just shut it all off. A long drive through the canyon. A weekend in a cabin. Focusing on refreshing my mind, body, and spirit. I could do all these things. I could find the time. It would be reasonable and justifiable. But, I don’t think I could shake the “Mom guilt” that is so often felt when I, or most mothers, do something for themselves. That’s the hard part.

So now, as the hours until dawn are getting closer, I’ll take a breath and ready myself for tomorrow. I’ll remember that this is the life I chose and I’ll remember all the good things that have from it. I take advantages of the learning opportunities as they present themselves, and I’ll flex my muscle. I talk to my spotter because without Him, nothing gets accomplished and I am at risk of hurting myself by pushing too far. I’ll finish my sets and complete the circuit. I’ll remember that the long-term rewards of my efforts far outweigh the short-term sacrifices I make. And I’ll see the blessing of it all.

When You Just Don’t Know What To Do

If you’ve been following my blog then you know that my life is full of normal family issues, plus the added not-so-normal issues that come with having a child with mental illness. I love my daughter, I wish I could help her more, I wish she didn’t have to struggle they way she does sometimes, but mostly I wish she didn’t have a mental illness.

Most well-adjust people realize that when you become a parent, there is a sudden switch turned on in your brain to love, protect, & provide for your child. It’s primal, innate, and you can’t ignore it. It’s what tells you whether a crying baby is hungry or tired, needs a diaper change or has a gas bubble. It never goes away, it just adjusts to your child’s changing needs as they get older. Most people do anything in their power to make sure they are the best parent they can be and ensure their child is prepared to become an adult. It’s your job to “Train up a child in the way he should go; even when he is old he will not depart from it” (Proverbs 22:6, ESV).

When you have a child with a fairly severe form of mental illness, you can do all the right things and still end up feeling like you’re failing. Some days, you just don’t know what to do. Take all the parenting books, advice from friends and family, and even some of the suggestions of doctors and toss it out the window. None of it will apply. You have to research and ask questions and advocate and get familiar with trial and error and make your own plan. In my case, you have to tell 3 different doctors that they’re wrong and keep looking for answers, get the right testing, get the right diagnosis- only to realize that things have gotten so bad that you have to have your child admitted to the state mental health hospital because everything you’ve done on an outpatient level isn’t effective. You know that despite your best efforts nothing outside of intensive inpatient treatment will benefit your 13 year-old daughter at that moment. So you make the hardest decision of your life and send her 80 miles away because you can’t help her anymore, you can’t protect her from herself, and you can’t provide what she needs.

Six months go by and great progress has been made. It’s like having a new child- literally 180* turn around. She’s happy, she’s smiling, cooperative, insightful, kind, loving, and has gained knowledge about herself. She has learned a bag full of “tricks” to be able to function outside the hospital. She gets to come home EXACTLY six months after her admission. As a parent you’re just so thankful to have her home, to have some sense of normalcy, and to have her feel better. Things are great and everyone is getting along and life is feeling right for the first time in a long time. Then the honeymoon ends.

Everyone has good days and bad days, and if they don’t they’re not normal. But recently I’m starting to realize that we’re (as a family) back to walking on eggshells and worrying about how to phrase even the simplest of words. The ups and downs have been more frequent and the bad days are starting to resemble life before hospitalization. I can tell when she’s letting her illness take over and speak for her and when she’s being a typical 14 year-old kid- most of the time. Then there are days when I just don’t know what to do anymore. I feel like maybe I’m dropping the ball somewhere, maybe I’m expecting to much, maybe I’m not expecting enough, or maybe her illness is evolving.

There are no easy answer when dealing with mental illness, especially when it comes to children and adolescents. Even more when it’s your child. I wish I could take it all away from her. She puts on a face of fearlessness and bravery, but she’s fragile and can be easily broken. I’ve cried so many tears over the last 18 months I don’t think I have any left, even when a good cry would really be nice. I worry about her future. I worry if she’ll be able to “adult” normally. I worry what will happen when I can’t make sure she takes her meds everyday or that she’s taking care of herself appropriately. Even when she makes me angry or upset because she’s said or done something to intentionally upset her sisters or mouths off to my husband, I keep telling myself silently that it’s going to be o.k. I remind myself that she can be kind and caring, compassionate and tender, my child yet a stranger.

I’ll never give up. I’ll always be pushing for more resources, more education, more awareness, and more strength. I’ll, WE, will get through the changes and the bad days. We’ll continue to celebrate small victories and learn from our setbacks. I’ll remember that this is my purpose her one earth. We’ll see the blessing in anything and everything, even the things that seem like they may break us.

I’m trying harder to “Let go, and let God”. I know that whatever I cannot handle only makes my trust in Him stronger and my faith even fuller. Even when I just don’t know what to do, He does.

“For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope.”- Jeremiah 29:11

Lately…

Lately life has been, well, busy. Between three kids in school, being school full time myself, having our new fluff-ball Paisley, balancing being a mom & wife…

Lately Audrey has been stable. Ups, downs, good days and bad days, moments of sincere love, happiness and kindness, and also moments of confusion, blind anger, and disappointment in herself. Paisley starts her Puppy Obedience 101 in a couple weeks so I am hoping this will give her a sense of purpose and pride.

Lately I have an overly emotional middle child. She loves everyone so much but then would give anything for a few hours of peace and quiet. She would be content reading books in her sweats or riding her bike alone for a while. She tries so hard to be understanding and tenderhearted in a house where even the most patient person might get twitchy.

Lately my little eight year old has been dramatic. Like, really dramatic over little things. The puppy  scratched her- time to amputate. She has her behavior corrected- all the problems of the world are her fault. She is asked to do her chores- she’s an underpaid maid. She is told she needs to practice her addition and subtraction facts- she can’t do ANYTHING right. I’m not sure why she reacts the way she does. Everything is approached in a level headed manner and in an age appropriate way. The other day I literally just stared at her after trying calm her anxiety over something- I didn’t know what else to say or do. I just stared. On a positive note, she started swim classes and is loving them!

Lately my husband and I barely get anytime to be together alone. The kids are SLOW to get to bed, he works terrible hours (6 am to 330 pm), and has to be in bed by 10 pm in order to function properly the next day. I miss watching our guilty-pleasure TV shows, having time to just talk uninterrupted or to take a day off from everything and just be lazy together. Even with the kids in the house on lazy days we can still give each other some much needed attention. Tomorrow (or today, rather) is his 47th birthday. We’re going to try and get some one-on-one time in.

Lately school has my head spinning. I have a year left, and I just applied for an international internship to Israel. I prayed about it, thought about it, and considered all the logistics of how things would go here at home if I am accepted into the program (which is a short term trip of only 11 days). Deep down I know this is a chance of a lifetime for me; I want this internship so badly. I also became a consultant for Thirty-One Gifts, a company specializing in organizational products, storage products, small purse & wallet line, and a small jewelry line. I was drawn to this company after a friend hosted a fundraiser for our family to help with the costs of getting a service dog. I loved their products and when I realized how much they give back to other organizations every month, it nudged me over the edge. This month they are donating  $75,000 to the Nationwide Childrens Hospital to fund behavioral health research & treatment for young girls. Clearly a topic near and dear to my heart. I am already off to a great start- and no I’m not plugging my business info in here. If you want it, just ask.

Lately I have realized that my family and I are blessed. Yes, life is difficult at times and there are days where I do want to “quit”, but when I put things into perspective it becomes clear that things could really be so much worse. I can get an education and so can my daughters. I can walk safely down my streets without worrying about a civil war going on in my town. I can worship freely. I can help others even when I’m having a bad day. Everyday I am given a new chance to be a better version of myself; to love better, to parent better, to learn better, and to give better. I can access healthcare for myself and my family. I wouldn’t mind a few upgrades in some areas but I have a good life and am thankful in all things.

Lately, when I think I have nothing left to give, God gives me the strength to keep moving on.

Lately, life has been good.

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Meet Paisley

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Well, here is our newest edition. This is Paisley, our Goldendoodle puppy that we will be training to be Audrey’s service dog. The wait list for organizations that train service animals were ranging anywhere from 6 months to 2 years, and right now that type of wait wasn’t something that was not feasible. Audrey needed her dog even if it we had to train it ourselves or find a local trainer to do the specialized training.

So that is what we will be doing. Paisley is only 11 weeks old so we will have the ability to start her training at home with the basics of housebreaking and other common training commands. As she progresses and gets older we will take her to a local trainer that can give her the specialized training to help Audrey and fit her specific needs.

Paisley is full of energy, playful, loving, and super smart. In the almost week we have had her she  has learned to sit, lay down, and to come. She loves to snuggle and irritate our German Shepherd, Shadow. She has truly filled our hearts with joy & filled an empty space in Audrey’s heart.

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Firsts

Last night marked a huge step forward for Audrey. She attended her first high school formal dance. She decided the day before that she wanted to go because a handful of her friends were going together as a group. I was thrilled but also worried. I was worried she would get to the dance and panic. I was worried she would change her mind at the last minute. I was worried she would get there and not be sure how to interact or be too nervous to really engage and enjoy the night. There were about 3 mini-emotional upsets but they passed.

And she proved me wrong.We bought the perfect dress & shoes. I did her hair in simple curls. Her make up consisted of a modest tinted moisturizer, setting powder, and blush.She was beautiful and confidant and amazing. I couldn’t imagine this moment a year ago, but here it was.

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I have never been more excited for her, more nervous, and also more aware of how quickly she is growing up. I am thankful everyday for the moments she enjoys as a beautiful, happy, thriving young lady. I pray for her continued progress in treatment. I take nothing for granted with her and her life. I know there is uncertainty about her future and there will continue to be for years to come.

But for now, I cherish these moments. I cherish her smile and her happiness in feeling like she belongs. I cherish the fact that the veil of her illness can be lifted, even momentarily, for nights like this.

What Nobody Tells You About Mental Illness

When you realize that somebody you love has a mental illness, your world very quickly turns upside down and inside out. You find yourself researching, reading, educating, and teaching yourself everything you can in order to be the best caretaker or support system you can. There’s doctor appointments, re-learning how to be a parent/spouse/friend, managing school or work, running your household, trying to maintain some sense of normalcy, and attempting to find time to rest.

What you’re not told about is the effects that ripple through the life you were previously living. Before I get much further, here are some statistics to help the context of this post:

Now with this information out there, here’s what nobody tells you about mental illness. Living with or caring for a person with a mental illness takes a toll on every fiber of your being. Physically, emotionally, mentally, spiritually, and in every other quantifiable way you can imagine. Respite is available, where your child can spend a day or weekend with a family or organization in order to give parents and caretakers a break. However, it takes a letter from Congress and an act of God to qualify for any services like that. If you’re a middle-class family, you may as well forget about getting any assistance that you will undoubtedly need. Access to mental health care is still the least available form of health care in the nation.

It puts an indescribable amount of strain on your marriage, as mentioned above, but even more so when you are in a blended family where there is a step-parent or step-children involved. You fight over how to parent your child, what the right treatment options are, how much time is dedicated to caring for your child, and who is best equipped to take on the various challenges that come up. Sometimes you and your spouse will even argue about if the behavior of your child is a result of their mental health disorder, their stage in development, or if they are just being manipulative. There may or not be occasions where you tell your spouse to “Stop, this isn’t helping”, “Why won’t you hear what I am telling you?”, or “I will deal with it by myself”.

If a married couple can’t be on the same page regarding the numerous variables in caring for a child with a mental health disorder the results can be unbearable and irreparable. Resentment, depression, avoiding each other, and cutting the other out of the loop regarding your child are all very real and very hurtful possibilities. There is a struggle to balance your love and devotion to your spouse and marriage while also meeting the needs of your child. Some days you almost feel like you have to choose one or the other. It’s a feeling that completely sucks.

This doesn’t apply to just spouses, but to the child being cared for and other children in the home as well.You see professionals fail to mention to also make plans for your other children- counseling for the adjustment in home life, planning out time to spend one-on-one with them, and trying to explain what is “wrong” with their sibling. Their school work may suffer and it’s difficult for children and siblings to know how to answer the questions that people will always ask. There are little to no organizations geared to assisting a family from a holistic point- addressing the child with the disorder, the parents, and other siblings. Finding the right support group or other organization is extremely difficult because, again, you are trying to find something that meets the needs of a group of people.

Finding a case worker/manager to answer your questions or to try to guide you through the maze that is the mental health care system can be an issue. The lack of providers and other team members that are involved in managing your childs care is lacking across the nation. The Utah State Hospital has approximately 350 beds to serve the entire state population of just over 3 million people. That serves less than 1% of the population. At Utah State University the wait to see a mental health care professional is 4-6 weeks.

Yet, at the end of the day, you keep pushing on. You continually pray for good days, small victories, and achieving the balance your family needs. You pray your marriage will withstand the challenges and that your other children grow up with a deeper  compassion for people. Outside of being able to cure your child or loved one, there is nothing you would change. You know deep down that you’re the only person who can care for them the way they need to be cared for. I will sacrifice and give, seek knowledge and guidance, and show love.

I don’t view my daughters disorders as something that makes her “beautiful”, “special”, or any of the other sentiments some people use to make their situation seem better or easier. I hate everything about her disorders. This isn’t because of the effect it has on me or my family but because it’s something that can’t be cured. She will always have to work 10 times harder than her peers to be successful. She will always have to cognitively deal with her emotions and manage her well-being. It’s a heavy load to carry and it’s my job to give her all the tools she needs while I can still make her take them.

Granted I have a strong faith base and fully acknowledge that God is helping us get through the ups and downs. Without Him, out life would surely be in shambles right now. Things aren’t perfect and on some days things aren’t even good. Despite this I know that, “Therefore, since we have been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. Through him we have also obtained access by faith into this grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in hope of the glory of God. Not only that, but we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance,  and endurance produces character, and character produces hope,  and hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us.” (Romans 5:1-5, ESV).

I take my role as a mother/caregiver seriously. Even though there were so many things nobody told me about mental illness, I have become more aware & educated in my goal to provide for my family as a WHOLE. To meet the needs of my daughter with a mental illness, to show my other children that they are equally important and loved, and to hold my marriage together to the best of my ability. And when I fail, which I do, I know I can “Let go, and let God”.

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Asking for Help When You’re the “Strong One”

If you’re like me you have been described as “so strong”, tough, or capable of overcoming anything that comes your way. These descriptions wouldn’t be wrong, either. For a long time, I prided myself on my strength and ability to remain resilient during life’s hard times. I found my way to calm waters or a safe harbor in many of the turbulent tides life often surrounds us with. In most of these situations I didn’t have to ask for help because the need was obvious. Divorce, illness, unemployment – these are all situations that people recognize and offer to help in some way, small or large.

But what do you do when you could really use some help but just don’t know how to ask for it? Humans often take their friendships and support systems for granted. For the most part they are always just “there” and often do what they’re supposed to do, in their respective roles, without having to be prompted. Sometimes the things we need help with prevent our help from coming to us, rendering most of us “strong” people in a conundrum. We don’t know how to ask for help or reach out. It’s a blow to our self-esteem and makes us feel weak. I don’t know about you but I am not particularly fond of feeling weak or vulnerable, but I also dislike not getting feedback or advice when it’s needed most.

Overcoming this fear, yes, fear of asking for help is anything but easy. It actually takes practice, rehearsing in your head, and making a plan of execution. Before any of that can even happen we have to recognize and accept that we need help; which is exhausting all on its own. I know to some this may sound like a lot of work for something that most people do without too much thought. Oh how I wish asking for help was more automatic or kicked in with auto-pilot type features when necessary.

Over the last 18 months I have had to learn to recognize, admit, and accept help from others. This ranges from my parents, friends, people at church, and at times God. Luckily, God knows our hearts and needs without words needing to be spoken. Psalm 34:18 (ESV) assures us that “The Lord is near to the brokenhearted and saves the crushed in spirit.” We don’t even have to speak a word but when we do take that time to pray, to speak to God one-on-one, we can be even more assured “And this is the confidence we toward Him, that if we ask anything according to His will He hears us. And if we know that He hears us in whatever we ask, we know that we have the requests that we have asked of Him” (1 John 5:14-15).

Family and friends are great when the problem is familiar and tangible, but when problems take  on less noticeable attributes there is One that knows our needs before we do. This is probably why our friends and family are so keen at just being there when we need them. However, we it feels like we’ve been forgotten maybe that’s God’s way of letting us know that we just need to take that time to turn our heads to heaven an make that direct connection with the One who connects us all.

Having Your Cake and Eating It Too

I suppose there is no such thing as being able to have your Cake and eat it too. Actually now that I think about it, what does that phrase actually mean? If you have cake, you’re going to eat it. Really, think about it. The  whole point of having your cake is to eat it. What is there preventing you from eating this cake? Nothing. Clearly this cake was intended for you to partake in, eat, & enjoy. Typically cake is present at celebrations, this is usually indicative of achieving an accomplishment, reaching a milestone, or in some cases ending something- retiring from a job or moving on to a new home or state.

In reality, if you’re getting cake then you had best eat it. You worked for it, you earned it, and in the grand scheme of things you deserve it. Cake represents victory, triumph, success, accolades, and perseverance. Cake is a sweet treat. It isn’t something (most of us) have everyday, so when the opportunity arises that cake is served we need to indulge and be in the moment.

Some of the ideals of today are intended to make people feel as though cake should just be  given to everybody regardless of their work ethic, contributions, or patience. There are those that would argue that cake should be shared with people who had no bearing on one’s success, lent no support, or is far removed from the situations surrounding the cake. This is an ideal I disagree with. Not everyone gets cake. Not everyone accomplishes something that is worthy of a cake filled event. There are people, sadly, who will never know the satisfaction of getting a cake they strived for and overcame challenges to receive. Some proponents would say that it isn’t fair for some people to not get cake. The only way I agree with this statement is when somebody has worked for their cake, yet they go unrecognized and not properly celebrated. They don’t get the cake they so rightfully earned.

For all of you out there working, sacrificing, and studying in order to have your cake and eat it too, more power to you. Keep moving forward, keep pressing on, and never let anyone make you feel guilty when that cake is finally yours. In fact, have two pieces if you can because you never know when you’ll be able to savor another cake worthy occasion again.

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Daily Prompt: Expert

So really all I can say is what an expert is and give you a really great example:

Expert : having or showing special skill or knowledge because of what you have been taught or what you have experienced.

Example: my sarcasm level is expert

If you would like details or demonstration, visit my blog. An expertise in sarcasm and a willingness to share it is just one of my many services.

 

So, so tired…

I love my life. I love my family. I love my kids. I love who I am and what I am.

But I am tired.

I am not using this blog as a place to be negative or complain about my life. I know that my life has a plan and a purpose, and in the long game everything will make sense. But sometimes even knowing that can’t help me get past days like today.

I’ve regained my desire to help at the kid’s school, something I couldn’t do much of last year given my family situation and trying to just be there while my daughter was being diagnosed. I’m doing some testing with elementary kids, getting to interact with adults again, and even have about a week of substituting lined up over the next couple of months.

I love subbing. Seriously, I never imagined I would enjoy subbing for high school kids as much as I do. Then again, this happens to be an exceptional group of kids. I’m in my fall term of classes and have one year left to get my B.S. in Developmental Psychology. I love school and am proud of how well I have done this far.

My husband and I are trying to have more couple time and even branch out to make new friends or join a small group at church. This is kind of a big deal since Shane isn’t super social nor was he raised the same religion as me (he was raised Roman-Catholic, we currently attend a Bible based non-denominational Christian church). Together we are trying to make time for each kid one-on-one, along with family time. This can be a bit of a task due to Audrey’s disorders but we try as hard as we can, using the best methods that we know.

I know this all sounds like normal family stuff, normal life stuff, normal human stuff. But it’s not. It’s takes every ounce of my strength mentally, physically, and especially emotionally to make life happen sometimes. Now is one of those times. I feel beat down, somewhat defeated, and I am almost positive someone is playing some kind of psychologically based warfare with me. Frankly, today they’re winning.

I’m a touch chick. I’ve been baptized by fire, graduated from the School of Hard Knocks, fought back against intellectuals in order to get the right treatment and diagnoses for my daughter, and I’ve faced down some proverbially ugly people quite successfully. But I’ve never faced an adversary quite like this. Attempting to hold some semblance of sanity and normalcy while having a child with mental health issues.

My daughter Audrey didn’t ask for her disorders and I am by no means resentful, upset, angry, or otherwise irritated that she is who she is. I’m just tired. If you read the links, it’s no easy task caring for a teen with these mental health disorders but we manage. I think the challenge of trying to balance everything else in life concurrently is where it gets complicated. Trying to share yourself, your time, and pieces of your life as equally as possible is like a second job. Trying to have friends and hobbies is almost impossible. Making sure you have friends that truly and genuinely understand your family life and who also want to be a part of your life regardless of the possibility of seeing the not-so-great side is even harder.

I look at people who deal with just “normal” teen stuff or “normal” family stuff, parents who can leave their 14 & 13-year-old at home without sitters, or those who can have the older sibling watch the younger sibling, and one of three things happen.

Scenario one: (a good day) I remember that we are each given the life we have for a purpose and I am doing a pretty damn good job with managing my purpose. I try to be a supportive friend with insight and advice.

Scenario two: (a “meh” day) I actually wish I had their problems. I wish for “normal” issues, I almost envy what they are dealing with. Pretty pathetic.

Scenario three: (a not-so-good day)  I have literally said “I know exactly what you mean because this is what I am currently juggling…..” and then proceed to try to convey that their life may have ups and down but I literally live in a state that inherently comes with an amount of uncertainty. I don’t like those days or how it feels. I’m pretty sure nobody else does either.

So, for those of you who have had to deal with me on those days- my deepest apologies.

I feel like I could sleep for 4 days. Sometimes I want to start crying at things that don’t warrant my tears. Certain days I want to use my mini-van in a demolition derby (which I feel pretty confident that I could win). I could also use a month-long vacation somewhere quiet, kid-free, sunny & sandy with an endless supply of umbrella garnished drinks.

The saying that “God never gives you more than you can handle” is one I have never subscribed to. I truly believe God gives us more than we can handle in order to learn to lean on Him and allow Him to guide and strengthen us. 2 Corinthians 12:9-10 (ESV) says, “But he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” Therefore I will boast all the more gladly of my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ may rest upon me. For the sake of Christ, then, I am content with weaknesses, insults, hardships, persecutions, and calamities. For when I am weak, then I am strong.” 

I am reminded by this passage that I can find rest and comfort by letting go and letting God be in control (as He should be). It’s not easy; no human wants to admit weakness or the need for help. But I don’t have the energy to be prideful *laughing*.

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